Recipe: Herbed Ricotta Tart

This was the alternative to the tomato tart. Since I do not eat tomatoes, an alternative was required!

Here’s the link to the original recipe, I like this David Leibovitz guy so far, every recipe I’ve tried has turned out: http://www.davidlebovitz.com/ 2009/08/herbed-ricotta-tart/ The recipe says it’s adapted from Local Flavors: Cooking & Eating from America’s Farmers’ Markets by Deborah Madison. Okay.

  • 8 oz spring onions (I forgot these)
  • 1 T. butter
  • 1 1/2 tsp. herb de provence
  • 8 ounces ricotta cheese
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 c. heavy cream
  • 1/2 c. half & half
  • 2 ounces spicy salami, diced
  • salt and freshly-ground pepper
  • One unbaked tart dough (see recipe, below)

Instructions

1. Slice the spring onions into 1/2-inch pieces. Melt the butter in a skillet and cook over medium heat, seasoning with a bit of salt and pepper, until tender and cooked through. When you remove it from the heat, stir in the fresh thyme and let cool to room temperature.

2. Preheat the oven to 400F (200C)

3. In a large bowl, crumble ricotta, then mix in the egg, cream, half & half, salami, and a bit more salt and pepper along with the onions.

4. Scrape the filling into the tart shell and bake until just set and slightly-browned on top, 20-30 minutes.

5. Let the tart cool briefly, then serve either warm or at room temperature. Sprinkle fresh thyme leaves over the top of the tart before serving.

Tart Dough

  • 1 1/2 c. flour
  • 4 1/2 ounces (125 g) butter, chilled, cut into cubes
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1 egg
  • 2-3 T cold water

1. Make the dough by mixing the flour and salt in a bowl. Add the butter and use your hands, or a pastry blender, to break in the butter until the mixture has a crumbly, cornmeal-like texture.

2. Mix the egg with 2 tablespoons of the water. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and add the beaten egg mixture, stirring the mixture until the dough holds together. If it’s not coming together easily, add the additional tablespoon of water.

3. Gather the dough into a ball and roll the dough on a lightly floured surface, adding additional flour only as necessary to keep the dough from sticking to the counter.

4. Once the dough is large enough so that it will cover the bottom of the pan and go up the sides, roll the dough around the rolling pin then unroll it over the tart pan. Press pastry firmly with your fingertips a few times, pressing in to make indentations.

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